Jul
30
Sun
2017
5th Effectuation Conference:“Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden”
Jul 30 @ 5:00 am – Aug 3 @ 5:00 pm

Baltimore, MD & Charlottesville, VA July 30th – August 3rd, 2017

Invitation & Call for Papers

After many years of gracious hosting outside the United States (thank you to all the various self-selected stakeholders), the 2017 effectuation conference will be held in Baltimore, MD and Charlottesville, VA. In addition to a traditional effectuation conference format (August 2 & 3), this event will feature two new elements of effectuation in social entrepreneurship (July 30 & 31), and a general session showcasing an overview of effectuation (August 1), both of which will address effectuation in new ways. Participants are encouraged toattend the entire conference or select from different elements, based on time and interest.

We provide a description of each of the elements of this conference, followed by a daily agenda.

Social Effectuation: Sunday July 30th& Monday July 31st, Baltimore, MD

How can effectuation help alleviate urban poverty? To address this question, the first element of the 5th Effectuation Conference will be held in Baltimore, MD. Building on the concept of the effectual dinner, conference participants will work with community leaders in West Baltimore to create a variety of solutions to local poverty. Teams will address various elements of the anti-poverty dinner by focusing on topics such as:

  • New venture creation
  • Workforce development
  • Health
  • Education
  • Food security

There is no submission requirement for this element of the conference.  We will accept the first 30 participants for this event.  Participants are responsible for their own travel and accommodation. Registration fees for this portion of the event, and the availability of a shuttle from Baltimore to Charlottesville,will be announced shortly.

Darden Showcase: Tuesday August 1st, Charlottesville, VA

This element of the 2017 effectuation conference is more general. In addition to scholars, Darden will invite alumni, entrepreneurs and members of the business community to participate. Consequently, the day will have an applied and practical feel, with talks from both entrepreneurs and from members of the academic community.

There is no submission requirement for this element of the conference, nor is there any registration fee. Participants are responsible for their own travel, meals and accommodation.

Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden: Wednesday August 2nd& Thursday August 3rd, Charlottesville, VA

This traditional aspect of the effectuation conference will offer both plenary sessions as well as small group research and practice “pods”.

Present your work

We invite participants with a research interest, a teaching interest and/or an interest in practical application to present their work. For those with a primary interest in research, we require participants to present a working paper. This work will be discussed in small groups in dedicated workshop sessions. For those with a primary interest in teaching and/or practice, we require participants to present a description or design of a practice they have used or are considering. We plan to have interactive sessions in which the various practices are shared between participants.

Paper submission

Research orientation: please submit an academic paper, or extended abstract of at least seven pages, but maximum 30 pages. Papers can be fully developed, but we particularly encourage the submission of working papers that can benefit from our interactive workshop format.

Teaching and practice orientation: please submit at least a three-page description or design of a practice you have used or are planning to use. That could be a teaching practice, a tool, an intervention design or a (consulting-) case. Please describe your experiences and list potential questions that you may have for discussing.

Both types of papers should be sent to the organizers. Please indicate the track you are submitting for (Practice/Teaching or Research).

Information & registration

There is no submission requirement for this element of the conference, nor is there any registration fee.  Participants are responsible for their own travel, meals and accommodation.

To keep the interactive and community atmosphere of the previous conference, acceptances will be limited to 50 participants.

Aligned with AoM

The traditional effectuation conference portion of the event is intentionally scheduled to end the day before the start of the Academy of Management meeting, a short flight away in Atlanta, GA, to facilitate travel for people wanting to attend both the effectuation conference and AoM. There are flights at the end of the day on August 3rd and on August 4th for those wishing to travel to Atlanta.

 Important deadlines

Paper submission (only for “Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden”):         March 15, 2017

Author notification (only for “Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden”):         May 1, 2017

Registration opens (all three elements of the conference):                           May 1, 2017

Registration closes (all three elements of the conference):                           May 31, 2017

Conference Logistics and Submission e-mail: effectuation@darden.virginia.edu

We hope that some or all of these activities encourage you to come join us.We look forward to seeing you in Baltimore and at Darden!

The local organizing committee;

Saras Sarasvathy, University of Virginia Darden School of Business

David Lingelbach, University of Baltimore

Tiago Ratinho, University of Baltimore

Social Effectuation: July 30th – July 31st, Baltimore, MD

Sunday July 30th

Timing Activity Location
5:00 – 7:00 pm Opening reception UB Law School, 12th floor

Monday, July 31st

Timing Activity Location
8-9:00am Introduction (including breakfast) UB Merrick School of Business
9:00-10:30am Walk to problem sites (maybe in break-out grounds) Various in West Baltimore (tbd)
10:30am-2:30pm Solution development (including lunch) UB Merrick School of Business
2:30-3:00pm Coffee break
3:00-4:00pm Debrief UB Merrick School of Business
4:30pm Buses depart for Charlottesville

(Amtrak train 5:12pm – 8:47pm)

Darden Showcase: Tuesday August 1st, Charlottesville, VA

Timing Activity Speaker
9:00am Introduction to effectuation Saras Sarasvathy
10:00am State of effectuation Stuart Read
10:30am Break
11:00am Entrepreneur (0penQ) OpenQ
11:30am An effectual perspective on new venture investing Robert Wiltbank
1:00pm Lunch (with keynote) Doug
2:30 pm Effectuation in the large organization (Stuart and others)
3:30 pm Break
4:00 pm Entrepreneur videos 3 entrepreneurs
4:15 pm Entrepreneur panel Sankaran Venkataraman
5:00 pm Concluding remarks Saras Sarasvathy &Sankaran Venkataraman
6:00pm Evening Event at Darden

Special note: This event is both the close of the general meeting and the start of the effectuation conference

7:00 pm Dinner presentation: Research keynote Dean Shepherd

Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden (Day 1): Wednesday August 2nd, Charlottesville, VA

Timing Activity Speaker
8:30 am State of Effectuation Stuart Read & Saras Sarasvathy
9:15 am Debrief on Baltimore David Lingelbach & Tiago Ratinho
10:00 am Break
10:30 am Pods (research and pedagogy) Small groups
12:00 pm Lunch and activity
1:00 pm Research Keynote Sankaran Venkataraman
2:30 pm Break
3:00 pm Pods (research and pedagogy) Small groups
4:30 pm Effectual Dinner Everyone
8:00 pm Effectual Music Markko Hamalainen& Jeff York

Bringing Effectuation Home to Darden (Day 2): Thursday August 3rd, Charlottesville, VA

Timing Activity Speaker
9:00 am Debrief on Dinner & Music Stuart Read & Saras Sarasvathy
10:30 am Break
11:00 am Pods (research and pedagogy) Small groups
12:30 pm Lunch
1:30 pm Teaching Keynote iKen
3:00 pm Break
3:30 pm Observer Observations Young Scholars (report out on the conference)
4:30 pm Closing activity with artifacts Saras Sarasvathy
5:00 pm Reception and optional dinner
For those attending AoM, travel to Atlanta

 

Feb
24
Fri
2017
Special Issue on Entrepreneurship Education with Impact: Opening the Black Box
Feb 24 all-day

2016.09_special_issue_eeCALL FOR PAPERS

Entrepreneurship Education (EE) has become recognized as a way of developing expertise and readiness to the challenges of modern labor markets in the context of work as well as the general context of an individual’s life. Classical distinctions o!enmade in EE are the di”erences between entrepreneurship and enterprising and in learning about, through, or for entrepreneurship. Although these di”erent EE-foci have consequences for learning outcomes, pedagogy, and the role of teachers, they are notmutually exclusive. On the contrary, these approaches can be seen as a natural progression in EE….

Register Online

Read more at: http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/edri/si/130234.pdf

Dec
1
Thu
2016
Special Issue! SBE Call for papers on effectuation – due December 1, 2016
Dec 1 all-day

si_call_sbe_effectuation_page_1CALL FOR PAPERS

Register Online

Special Issue of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal

“Effectuation and entrepreneurship theory: How effectuation relates to other concepts, models, and theories within entrepreneurship”

Special Issue Editors:
Gry Agnete Alsos, Nord University
Tommy Høyvarde Clausen, Nord University
René Mauer, ESCP Europe Berlin
Stuart Read, Willamette University
Saras Sarasvathy, University of Virginia
Deadline: December 1 2016

Effectuation is a new proposed theory of entrepreneurship that challenges the traditional understanding of entrepreneurial decision-making and behavior (Sarasvathy, 2001). During the last 15 years, a growing number of studies examine entrepreneurship from an effectuation lens and further develop a variety of ideas related to effectuation. Although effectuation has gained substantial interest in the literature (Arend, Sarooghi, & Burkemper, 2015) theorizing on effectuation is still in its infancy and fragmented. Despite its potential, there is still rather limited diffusion of effectuation into the wider literature. In this Special Issue, we seek to advance effectuation as a theory of entrepreneurship by examining how it relates to other concepts, models, and theories that also seek to understand and explain entrepreneurial action. Such an endeavor may help diffuse the insights from effectuation theory to other literatures, fertilize theorizing in other domains (Arend et al., 2015), and offer new insights back to effectuation. More generally, these efforts may help establish the unique contribution of effectuation to our understanding of entrepreneurial action. To accomplish these objectives, it is useful to construct connections with related and important literature streams related to management, entrepreneurship, and innovation.

Starting from existing work on effectuation, several literature streams can be identified. One explores different building blocks of effectuation, such as the different principles or the notion of expertise (Dew, Read, Sarasvathy, & Wiltbank, 2008, 2009; Dew & Sarasvathy, 2007; Dew, Sarasvathy, Read, & Wiltbank, 2009; Sarasvathy, Dew, Read, & Wiltbank, 2008). Another tests the borders of effectuation by using it to examine R&D project behavior (Brettel, Mauer, Engelen, & Küpper, 2012), business angel investing (Wiltbank, Read, Dew, & Sarasvathy, 2009), and product/market strategy decisions (Deligianni, Voudouris, & Lioukas, 2015), with some studies conceptualizing effectuation as a corporate strategic orientation (Werhahn, Mauer, Flatten, & Brettel, 2015). These studies demonstrate that the applicability of the effectuation concept is wide with promising routes also for further research.

Existing studies have begun to relate concepts from the entrepreneurship literature to establish conceptual antecedents and consequences of effectuation and causation. Issues such as the role of human capital and organizational environment (da Costa & Brettel, 2011; Johansson & McKelvie, 2012), experience of the entrepreneur (Alsos & Clausen, 2014; Harms & Schiele, 2012), entrepreneurial self-efficacy (Engel, Dimitrova, Khapova, & Elfring, 2014), and career motives (Gabrielsson & Politis, 2011) for the use of effectuation by entrepreneurs have been studied. Further, studies have tested relationships between effectuation and various outcomes such as exit strategies (DeTienne & Chandler, 2010), export/internationalization (Harms & Schiele, 2012; Kalinic, Sarasvathy, & Forza, 2014), R&D project performance (Brettel et al., 2012), new venture performance (Deligianni et al., 2015), creativity in new product development processes (Blauth, Mauer, & Brettel, 2014), and conflict in entrepreneur-investor relationships (Appelhoff, Mauer, Collewaert, & Brettel, 2015). Finally, the potential overlaps and complementarity of effectuation and other emerging concepts as opportunity creation and bricolage (Fisher, 2012; Welter, Mauer, & Wuebker, 2015). Although these studies suggest a variety of interesting mechanisms, critical reviews have called for more solid theoretical grounding for effectuation as well as a better integration with other concepts, models and theories (Arend et al., 2015).

The aim of this Special Issue of Small Business Economics is to embrace this development, encouraging the discussion of effectuation in relation to key topics and theoretical concepts in the field of entrepreneurship. We anticipate that the special issue will follow a trend of integrating effectuation into the wider entrepreneurship literature, responding to calls for advancing entrepreneurship theory and the development of entrepreneurship as a distinct field of research (Davidsson, Low, & Wright, 2001; Shane & Venkataraman, 2000; Shepherd, 2015). On the other side, we expect that special issue submissions will also respond to calls for testing and critically examining effectuation as theory (Arend et al., 2015; Perry, Chandler, & Markova, 2012). Hence, we seek papers that integrate effectuation theory with other theoretical concepts, models, and theories related to entrepreneurship, with the aim of contributing to the understanding of effectuation as well as to the broader field of entrepreneurship. Convergent and divergent approaches are welcomed, i.e. effectuation can contrast or fertilize other perspectives. To provide some specifics, topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

Antecedents
– What are antecedents to effectuation, and how does context matter?
– How do different types and sources of learning relate to effectuation and causation?
– What is the role of goal setting, planning, and negotiations in effectuation and causation?
– How is effectuation and causation related to characteristics of entrepreneurial opportunities or business ideas, and to opportunity development processes?
– How do effectuation and causation materialize in levels beyond the individual, such as entrepreneurial teams or at the organizational level?

Consequences
– What are relevant dependent variables for effectuation, and how do the causal mechanisms between effectuation and the dependent variables work?
– How do effectuation and causation relate to innovation?
– How is effectuation and causation by the entrepreneur related to subsequent organizational processes such as resource acquisition, financing, resource configuration,

internationalization, and the choice of product/market strategies?
– What role does effectuation and causation play in corporate entrepreneurship?
Related Literatures & Ideas
– What are the relationships between entrepreneurial concepts (such as start-up activities, venture gestation, pivoting, business models, venture performance, failure, etc.) with effectuation?
– How does theory of effectuation relate to broader theoretical frameworks such as evolutionary theory, resource dependency theory, resource-based view, institutional theory, etc.?
– What is the relationship between effectuation, bricolage, and improvisation?
– How can effectual and causal behavior be influenced or shaped by institutional pressures, and how is effectuation linked to the formation and change of institutions?

This is an open call and we welcome articles for consideration from members of the global research community with interest in the above mentioned issues. This special issue of Small Business Economics
is offered in conjunction with the 4th Effectuation Conference that is to be held in Bodø, Norway June 5-7 2016.

Guidelines for authors
• Submissions to this special issue should be sent electronically to SI-effectuationSBE@nord.no
• Papers should be 5000-8000 words in length, including references.
• All papers should be fully referenced and follow the publisher’s submission policies for style and format. Appropriate permissions should be obtained, where relevant.

Journal guidelines are found at: http://www.springer.com/new+%26+forthcoming+titles+%28default%29/journal….
• Submitted papers should not currently be in print or submitted for consideration to another journal.
• All papers will undergo double blind review as per standard review process followed by Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal.
• Submission deadline: December 1 2016
• For additional information, please contact gry.a.alsos@nord.no.

Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal publishes rigorous research on entrepreneurship, self-employment, family firms, small and medium-sized firms, and new venture creation. The journal has a broad scope, including entrepreneurs’ characteristics, occupational choice, new ventures and innovation, firms’ life courses and performance; as well as the role played by institutions and public policies within local, regional, national, and international contexts. Articles published in Small Business Economics typically emphasize the economic and societal relevance of research findings. As a leading entrepreneurship journal, Small Business Economics publishes both theoretical and empirical papers, while encouraging interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research from a broad spectrum of disciplines and related fields.

References
Alsos, G. A., & Clausen, T. H. (2014). The start-up processes of tourism firms – the use of causation and effectuation strategies. In G. A. Alsos, D. Eide, & E. L. Madsen (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Innovation in Tourism. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.
Appelhoff, D., Mauer, R., Collewaert, V., & Brettel, M. (2015). The conflict potential of the entrepreneur’s decision-making style in the entrepreneur-investor relationship. International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, 1-23.
Arend, R. J., Sarooghi, H., & Burkemper, A. (2015). Effectuation as ineffectual? Applying the 3E theory-assessment framework to a proposed new theory of entrepreneurship. Academy of Management Review, 40(4), 630-651.
Blauth, M., Mauer, R., & Brettel, M. (2014). Fostering Creativity in New Product Development through Entrepreneurial Decision Making. Creativity and Innovation Management, 23(4), 495-509.
Brettel, M., Mauer, R., Engelen, A., & Küpper, D. (2012). Corporate effectuation: Entrepreneurial action and its impact on R&D project performance. Journal of Business Venturing, 27(2), 167-184.
da Costa, A. F., & Brettel, M. (2011). Employee effectuation – What makes corporate employees act like entrepreneurs. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 31(17), 2.
Davidsson, P., Low, M. B., & Wright, M. (2001). Editor’s introduction: Low and MacMillan ten years on: Achievements and future directions for entrepreneurship research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 25(4), 5-16.
Deligianni, I., Voudouris, I., & Lioukas, S. (2015). Do Effectuation Processes Shape the Relationship Between Product Diversification and Performance in New Ventures? Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice.
DeTienne, D. R., & Chandler, G. N. (2010). The impact of motivation and causation and effectuation approaches on exit strategies. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 30(1), 1-12. Retrieved from http://digitalknowledge.babson.edu/fer/vol30/iss1/1
Dew, N., Read, S., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Wiltbank, R. (2008). Outlines of a behavioral theory of the entrepreneurial firm. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 66(1), 37-59.
Dew, N., Read, S., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Wiltbank, R. (2009). Effectual versus predictive logics in entrepreneurial decision-making: Differences between experts and novices. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(4), 287-309.
Dew, N., & Sarasvathy, S. (2007). Innovations, Stakeholders & Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics, 74(3), 267-283.
Dew, N., Sarasvathy, S. D., Read, S., & Wiltbank, R. (2009). Affordable loss: behavioral economic aspects of the plunge decision. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 3(2), 105-126.
Engel, Y., Dimitrova, N. G., Khapova, S. N., & Elfring, T. (2014). Uncertain but able: Entrepreneurial self-efficacy and novices ׳ use of expert decision-logic under uncertainty. Journal of Business
Venturing Insights, 1, 12-17.
Fisher, G. (2012). Effectuation, Causation, and Bricolage: A Behavioral Comparison of Emerging Theories in Entrepreneurship Research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 36(5), 1019-1051.
Gabrielsson, J., & Politis, D. (2011). Career motives and entrepreneurial decision-making: examining preferences for causal and effectual logics in the early stage of new ventures. Small Business Economics, 36(3), 281-298.
Harms, R., & Schiele, H. (2012). Antecedents and consequences of effectuation and causation in the international new venture creation process. Journal of International Entrepreneurship, 10(2), 1-22.
Johansson, A., & McKelvie, A. (2012, 6-9 June 2012). Unpacking the antecedents of effectuation and causation in a corporate context. Paper presented at the Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Fort Worth, TX, USA.
Kalinic, I., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Forza, C. (2014). ‘Expect the unexpected’: Implications of effectual logic on the internationalization process. International Business Review, 23(3), 635-647.
Perry, J. T., Chandler, G. N., & Markova, G. (2012). Entrepreneurial Effectuation: A Review and Suggestions for Future Research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 36(4), 837-861.
Sarasvathy, S. D. (2001). Causation and Effectuation: Toward a Theoretical Shift from Economic Inevitability to Entrepreneurial Contingency. The Academy of Management Review, 26(2), 243-263.
Sarasvathy, S. D., Dew, N., Read, S., & Wiltbank, R. (2008). Designing Organizations that Design Environments: Lessons from Entrepreneurial Expertise. Organization Studies, 29(3), 331-350.
Shane, S., & Venkataraman, S. (2000). The promise of entrepreneurship as a field of research. Academy of Management Review, 25(1), 217-226.
Shepherd, D. A. (2015). Party On! A call for entrepreneurship research that is more interactive, activity based, cognitively hot, compassionate, and prosocial. Journal of Business Venturing, 30(4), 489-507.
Welter, C., Mauer, R., & Wuebker, R. (2015). Bridging Behavioral Models and Theoretical Concepts: Effectuation and Bricolage in the Opportunity Creation Framework. Forthcoming, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal Special Issue: Theories of Entrepreneurship.
Werhahn, D., Mauer, R., Flatten, T. C., & Brettel, M. (2015). Validating effectual orientation as strategic direction in the corporate context. European Management Journal, 33(5), 305-313.
Wiltbank, R., Read, S., Dew, N., & Sarasvathy, S. D. (2009). Prediction and control under uncertainty: Outcomes in angel investing. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(2), 116-133.

CALL FOR PAPERS: Special Issue of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal
Dec 1 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS
Special Issue of Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal

“Effectuation and entrepreneurship theory: How effectuation relates to other concepts, models, and theories within entrepreneurship”

Special Issue Editors:
Gry Agnete Alsos, Nord University
Tommy Høyvarde Clausen, Nord University
René Mauer, ESCP Europe Berlin
Stuart Read, Willamette University
Saras Sarasvathy, University of Virginia

Deadline: December 1 2016

Effectuation is a new proposed theory of entrepreneurship that challenges the traditional  understanding of entrepreneurial decision-making and behavior (Sarasvathy, 2001). During the last 15 years, a growing number of studies examine entrepreneurship from an effectuation lens and further develop a variety of ideas related to effectuation. Although effectuation has gained substantial interest in the literature (Arend, Sarooghi, & Burkemper, 2015) theorizing on effectuation is still in its infancy and fragmented. Despite its potential, there is still rather limited diffusion of effectuation into the wider literature. In this Special Issue, we seek to advance effectuation as a theory of entrepreneurship by examining how it relates to other concepts, models, and theories that also seek to understand and explain entrepreneurial action. Such an endeavor may help diffuse the insights from effectuation theory to other literatures, fertilize theorizing in other domains (Arend et al., 2015), and offer new insights back to effectuation. More generally, these efforts may help establish the unique contribution of effectuation to our understanding of entrepreneurial action. To accomplish these objectives, it is useful to construct connections with related and important literature streams related to management, entrepreneurship,  and innovation.

Starting from existing work on effectuation, several literature streams can be identified. One explores different building blocks of effectuation, such as the different principles or the notion of expertise (Dew, Read, Sarasvathy, & Wiltbank, 2008, 2009; Dew & Sarasvathy, 2007; Dew, Sarasvathy, Read, & Wiltbank, 2009; Sarasvathy, Dew, Read, & Wiltbank, 2008). Another tests the borders of effectuation by using it to examine R&D project behavior (Brettel, Mauer, Engelen, & Küpper, 2012), business angel investing (Wiltbank, Read, Dew, & Sarasvathy, 2009), and product/market strategy decisions (Deligianni, Voudouris, & Lioukas, 2015), with some studies conceptualizing effectuation as a corporate strategic orientation (Werhahn, Mauer, Flatten, & Brettel, 2015). These studies demonstrate that the applicability of the effectuation concept is wide with promising routes also for further research.

Existing studies have begun to relate concepts from the entrepreneurship literature to establish conceptual antecedents and consequences of effectuation and causation. Issues such as the role of human capital and organizational environment (da Costa & Brettel, 2011; Johansson & McKelvie, 2012), experience of the entrepreneur (Alsos & Clausen, 2014; Harms & Schiele, 2012), entrepreneurial self-efficacy (Engel, Dimitrova, Khapova, & Elfring, 2014), and career motives (Gabrielsson & Politis, 2011) for the use of effectuation by entrepreneurs have been studied. Further, studies have tested relationships between effectuation and various outcomes such as exit strategies (DeTienne & Chandler, 2010), export/internationalization (Harms & Schiele, 2012; Kalinic, Sarasvathy, & Forza, 2014), R&D project performance (Brettel et al., 2012), new venture performance (Deligianni et al., 2015), creativity in new product development processes (Blauth, Mauer, & Brettel, 2014), and conflict in entrepreneur-investor relationships (Appelhoff, Mauer, Collewaert, & Brettel, 2015). Finally, the potential overlaps and complementarity of effectuation and other emerging concepts as opportunity creation and bricolage (Fisher, 2012; Welter, Mauer, & Wuebker, 2015). Although these studies suggest a variety of interesting mechanisms, critical reviews have called for more solid theoretical grounding for effectuation as well as a better integration with other concepts, models and theories (Arend et al., 2015).

The aim of this Special Issue of Small Business Economics is to embrace this development, encouraging the discussion of effectuation in relation to key topics and theoretical concepts in the field of entrepreneurship. We anticipate that the special issue will follow a trend of integrating effectuation into the wider entrepreneurship literature, responding to calls for advancing entrepreneurship theory and the development of entrepreneurship as a distinct field of research (Davidsson, Low, & Wright, 2001; Shane & Venkataraman, 2000; Shepherd, 2015). On the other side, we expect that special issue submissions will also respond to calls for testing and critically examining effectuation as theory (Arend et al., 2015; Perry, Chandler, & Markova, 2012). Hence, we seek papers that integrate effectuation theory with other theoretical concepts, models, and theories related to entrepreneurship, with the aim of contributing to the understanding of effectuation as well as to the broader field of entrepreneurship. Convergent and divergent approaches are welcomed, i.e. effectuation can contrast or fertilize other perspectives. To provide some specifics, topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

Antecedents
– What are antecedents to effectuation, and how does context matter?
– How do different types and sources of learning relate to effectuation and causation?
– What is the role of goal setting, planning, and negotiations in effectuation and causation?
– How is effectuation and causation related to characteristics of entrepreneurial opportunities or business ideas, and to opportunity development processes?
– How do effectuation and causation materialize in levels beyond the individual, such as entrepreneurial teams or at the organizational level?

Consequences
– What are relevant dependent variables for effectuation, and how do the causal mechanisms between effectuation and the dependent variables work?
– How do effectuation and causation relate to innovation?
– How is effectuation and causation by the entrepreneur related to subsequent organizational processes such as resource acquisition, financing, resource configuration, internationalization, and the choice of product/market strategies?
– What role does effectuation and causation play in corporate entrepreneurship?

Related Literatures & Ideas
– What are the relationships between entrepreneurial concepts (such as start-up activities, venture gestation, pivoting, business models, venture performance, failure, etc.) with effectuation?
– How does theory of effectuation relate to broader theoretical frameworks such as evolutionary theory, resource dependency theory, resource-based view, institutional theory, etc.?
– What is the relationship between effectuation, bricolage, and improvisation?
– How can effectual and causal behavior be influenced or shaped by institutional pressures, and how is effectuation linked to the formation and change of institutions?

This is an open call and we welcome articles for consideration from members of the global research community with interest in the above mentioned issues. This special issue of Small Business Economics is offered in conjunction with the 4th Effectuation Conference that is to be held in Bodø, Norway
June 5-7 2016.

Guidelines for authors
• Submissions to this special issue should be sent electronically to SI-effectuationSBE@nord.no
• Papers should be 5000-8000 words in length, including references.
• All papers should be fully referenced and follow the publisher’s submission policies for style and format. Appropriate permissions should be obtained, where relevant. Journal guidelines are found at: http://www.springer.com/new+%26+forthcoming+titles+%28default%29/journal….
• Submitted papers should not currently be in print or submitted for consideration to another journal.
• All papers will undergo double blind review as per standard review process followed by Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal.
• Submission deadline: December 1 2016
• For additional information, please contact gry.a.alsos@nord.no.

Small Business Economics: An Entrepreneurship Journal publishes rigorous research on entrepreneurship, self-employment, family firms, small and medium-sized firms, and new venture creation. The journal has a broad scope, including entrepreneurs’ characteristics, occupational choice, new ventures and innovation, firms’ life courses and performance; as well as the role played by institutions and public policies within local, regional, national, and international contexts. Articles published in Small Business Economics typically emphasize the economic and societal relevance of research findings. As a leading entrepreneurship journal, Small Business Economics publishes both theoretical and empirical papers, while encouraging interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research from a broad spectrum of disciplines and related fields.

References

Alsos, G. A., & Clausen, T. H. (2014). The start-up processes of tourism firms – the use of causation and effectuation strategies. In G. A. Alsos, D. Eide, & E. L. Madsen (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Innovation in Tourism. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

Appelhoff, D., Mauer, R., Collewaert, V., & Brettel, M. (2015). The conflict potential of the entrepreneur’s decision-making style in the entrepreneur-investor relationship. International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, 1-23.

Arend, R. J., Sarooghi, H., & Burkemper, A. (2015). Effectuation as ineffectual? Applying the 3E theory-assessment framework to a proposed new theory of entrepreneurship. Academy of Management Review, 40(4), 630-651.

Blauth, M., Mauer, R., & Brettel, M. (2014). Fostering Creativity in New Product Development through Entrepreneurial Decision Making. Creativity and Innovation Management, 23(4), 495-509.

Brettel, M., Mauer, R., Engelen, A., & Küpper, D. (2012). Corporate effectuation: Entrepreneurial action and its impact on R&D project performance. Journal of Business Venturing, 27(2), 167-184.

da Costa, A. F., & Brettel, M. (2011). Employee effectuation – What makes corporate employees act like entrepreneurs. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 31(17), 2.

Davidsson, P., Low, M. B., & Wright, M. (2001). Editor’s introduction: Low and MacMillan ten years on: Achievements and future directions for entrepreneurship research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 25(4), 5-16.

Deligianni, I., Voudouris, I., & Lioukas, S. (2015). Do Effectuation Processes Shape the Relationship Between Product Diversification and Performance in New Ventures? Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice.

DeTienne, D. R., & Chandler, G. N. (2010). The impact of motivation and causation and effectuation approaches on exit strategies. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 30(1), 1-12. Retrieved from http://digitalknowledge.babson.edu/fer/vol30/iss1/1

Dew, N., Read, S., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Wiltbank, R. (2008). Outlines of a behavioral theory of the entrepreneurial firm. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 66(1), 37-59.

Dew, N., Read, S., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Wiltbank, R. (2009). Effectual versus predictive logics in entrepreneurial decision-making: Differences between experts and novices. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(4), 287-309.

Dew, N., & Sarasvathy, S. (2007). Innovations, Stakeholders & Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics, 74(3), 267-283.

Dew, N., Sarasvathy, S. D., Read, S., & Wiltbank, R. (2009). Affordable loss: behavioral economic aspects of the plunge decision. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 3(2), 105-126.

Engel, Y., Dimitrova, N. G., Khapova, S. N., & Elfring, T. (2014). Uncertain but able: Entrepreneurial self-efficacy and novices׳ use of expert decision-logic under uncertainty. Journal of Business Venturing Insights, 1, 12-17.

Fisher, G. (2012). Effectuation, Causation, and Bricolage: A Behavioral Comparison of Emerging Theories in Entrepreneurship Research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 36(5), 1019-1051.

Gabrielsson, J., & Politis, D. (2011). Career motives and entrepreneurial decision-making: examining preferences for causal and effectual logics in the early stage of new ventures. Small Business Economics, 36(3), 281-298.

Harms, R., & Schiele, H. (2012). Antecedents and consequences of effectuation and causation in the international new venture creation process. Journal of International Entrepreneurship, 10(2), 1-22.

Johansson, A., & McKelvie, A. (2012, 6-9 June 2012). Unpacking the antecedents of effectuation and causation in a corporate context. Paper presented at the Babson College Entrepreneurship Research Conference, Fort Worth, TX, USA.

Kalinic, I., Sarasvathy, S. D., & Forza, C. (2014). ‘Expect the unexpected’: Implications of effectual logic on the internationalization process. International Business Review, 23(3), 635-647.

Perry, J. T., Chandler, G. N., & Markova, G. (2012). Entrepreneurial Effectuation: A Review and Suggestions for Future Research. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 36(4), 837-861.

Sarasvathy, S. D. (2001). Causation and Effectuation: Toward a Theoretical Shift from Economic Inevitability to Entrepreneurial Contingency. The Academy of Management Review, 26(2), 243-263.

Sarasvathy, S. D., Dew, N., Read, S., & Wiltbank, R. (2008). Designing Organizations that Design Environments: Lessons from Entrepreneurial Expertise. Organization Studies, 29(3), 331-350.

Shane, S., & Venkataraman, S. (2000). The promise of entrepreneurship as a field of research. Academy of Management Review, 25(1), 217-226.

Shepherd, D. A. (2015). Party On! A call for entrepreneurship research that is more interactive, activity based, cognitively hot, compassionate, and prosocial. Journal of Business Venturing,
30(4), 489-507.

Welter, C., Mauer, R., & Wuebker, R. (2015). Bridging Behavioral Models and Theoretical Concepts: Effectuation and Bricolage in the Opportunity Creation Framework. Forthcoming, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal Special Issue: Theories of Entrepreneurship.

Werhahn, D., Mauer, R., Flatten, T. C., & Brettel, M. (2015). Validating effectual orientation as strategic direction in the corporate context. European Management Journal, 33(5), 305-313.

Wiltbank, R., Read, S., Dew, N., & Sarasvathy, S. D. (2009). Prediction and control under uncertainty: Outcomes in angel investing. Journal of Business Venturing, 24(2), 116-133.

Nov
9
Wed
2016
Onramp Is Adding Two Expansion Cities
Nov 9 all-day

onrampRegister Online

Onramp Is Adding Two Expansion Cities

Onramp Institute utilizes Effectuation as the foundation for its innovative summer program that offers newly minted and recent college graduates a strategic bridge for successfully transitioning to the world of work by providing an understanding of how to immediately begin adding value with an innovative, entrepreneurial mindset – “wherever they work and whatever their role.”

Onramp Enterprises, a 501(c)3 non-profit educational organization, currently located and operating in Portland, Oregon, is seeking to add new locations beginning in the summer of 2017, and is actively seeking candidates who can help fulfill our mission and build our program.

In keeping with the tenets of effectuation, Onramp’s Board of Trustees has chosen to determine location of our first expansion cities in large measure dependent on the City Director candidates who step forward with an interest in collaborative development.  Both US and international locations are open for consideration.

Onramp City Directors will be paid a stipend of $20,000($US) — and are anticipated to be supported by a TA who will also receive compensation.

More details about the role and activities are available at:  onrampinstitute.org/new-city-directors/

Contact: mak@onrampinstitute.org

Jun
6
Mon
2016
Effectuation Conference – Bodø Norway – June 6 & 7, 2016
Jun 6 @ 9:30 am – Jun 7 @ 5:00 pm

call_effectuation_conference_2016_updated_page_1Register Online

Nord University Business School (former University of Nordland) and Nordland Research Institute are pleased to invite you to the

4th Effectuation Conference

June 6-7, 2016, Bodø, Norway

Research, Teaching & Practice

Starting with a story about “Curry in a Hurry”, there are many unique aspects to effectuation. One we treasure in particular is how the idea crosses the lines of research, teaching and practice while retaining its integrity and its usefulness. We hope to embody that aspect, bringing together intellectually curious people to dive deep within the lines, blur the lines or maybe even remove the lines.

Present your work

We invite participants with a research interest, a teaching interest and/or an interest in practical application to present their work. For those with a primary interest in research, we require participants to present a working paper. This work will be discussed in small groups in dedicated workshop sessions. For those with a primary interest in teaching and/or practice, we require participants to present a description or design of a practice they have used or are considering. We plan to have interactive sessions in which the various practices are shared between participants.

Paper submission

Research orientation: please submit an academic paper, or extended abstract of at least 7 pages, but with a maximum of 30 pages. Papers can be fully developed, but we particularly encourage the submission of working papers that can benefit from our interactive workshop format.

Teaching and practice orientation: please submit at least a three-page description or design of a practice you have used or are planning to use. That could be a teaching practice, a tool, an intervention design or a (consulting-) case. Please describe your experiences and list potential questions that you may have for discussing.

Both types of papers should be sent to the organizers at: effectuation@uin.no. Please indicate the track you are submitting for (Practice/Teaching or Research).

Information & registration

The registration fee for the conference is € 220 (incl. VAT). To keep the interactive and community atmosphere of the previous conference, participation will be limited to 50 participants. For information concerning registration and logistics, as well as updates of the program, please consult the website: www.uin.no/effectuation

Important deadlines

Paper submission: February 8, 2016
Author notification: February 28, 2016
Registration opens: March 30, 2016
Registration closes: pril 18, 2016
Conference: June 6-7, 2016

Practical conference information

Maja Nilssen: mni@uin.no or +47 75 51 76 38

Sølvi Solvoll: sso@nforsk.no or +47 75 41 18 38

Submission e-mail: effectuation@uin.no

 

We look forward to see you in Bodø!

The local organizing committee;

Tommy Høyvarde Clausen, Nord University Business School

Gry Agnete Alsos, Nord University Business School

Sølvi Solvoll, Nordland Research Institute

 

And our committed stakeholders;

Saras Sarasvathy, Darden Business School

Stuart Read, Willamette University

René Mauer, ESCP Europe Berlin

Tiago Ratinho, University of Baltimore

Phillippe Silberzahn, EM Lyon

Thomas Blekman, De Beukelaar Group

Michael Faschingbauer, Effectuation Intelligence

Jun
8
Mon
2015
Co-creation in Morocco
Jun 8 all-day

Register Online

Summer effectuation boot camp for startups – June 8-12 – please see link for full details.

Dec
8
Mon
2014
3rd Effectuation Research and Teaching Conference
Dec 8 @ 10:00 am – Dec 9 @ 5:00 pm

Register Online

See the link for event description.

Nov
1
Sat
2014
DREAM Effectuation Doctoral Seminar in Tianjin China, November 2014
Nov 1 all-day
Jun
9
Mon
2014
DREAM Effectuation Doctoral Seminar in Port Elizabeth South Africa, June 2014
Jun 9 @ 9:30 am – Jun 11 @ 5:00 pm
Jun
3
Mon
2013
Effectuation in Lyon June 3rd and 4th, 2013 (Save the Date!)
Jun 3 @ 10:00 am – Jun 4 @ 5:45 pm

lyonconf1_0Register Online

EMLYON Business School and the Netherlands Institute for Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship (NIKOS), University of Twente are pleased to invite you to the:

2nd Effectuation Research and Teaching Conference
3-4 June 2013, Lyon, France
(Just before the Babson BCERC conference, also in Lyon)

Conference theme:
Moving Forward: Chances and Challenges in Effectuation Research and Teaching
Research and teaching on effectuation, a logic used by expert entrepreneurs to solve problems in highly uncertain market environments, have substantially grown and progressed in the past decade. Along with the progress, effectuation research and teaching are facing important challenges now. The fruitfulness of future effectuation research, for example, depends on the conceptual clarity of the effectuation construct, its connection to other entrepreneurship constructs and the development of valid and reliable measurement instruments. Furthermore, evidence on teaching didactics and practices will have to show which are most effective for which groups of students.

The purpose of the conference is to bring together scholars interested in furthering the development of effectuation research and teaching and in emerging as a community. The conference will address issues related to both teaching and research in a workshop format that will be studious, but fun.
Professors Saras Sarasvathy (Darden) and Stuart Read (IMD) are our co-hosts and co-creators for this conference, engaged throughout the event, which will include the following topics:

Research:

  • Developing and clarifying the effectuation concept
  • Relation of effectuation to other entrepreneurship concepts
  • Measuring effectuation and its dimensions
  • New research inspired by effectuation research

Teaching:

  • Alternatives to the Business Plan
  • New teaching practices and materials
  • Effectiveness of teaching methods

Present your work
We invite participants with a research interest and/or with a teaching interest to present their work. For those with a primary interest in research, we require participants to present a working paper. This work will be discussed in small groups in dedicated workshop sessions. For those with a primary interest in teaching, we require participants to present a teaching practice they have used or are considering. We plan to have interactive sessions in which the various practices are shared between participants.

Paper submission
Please submit an academic paper, or extended abstract of at least seven pages. Papers can be fully developed, but we particularly stimulate the submission of working papers that can benefit from our interactive workshop format. We are planning a special issue and conference papers may be preselected for this.

Teaching orientation
Please submit at least a three-page description or design of a teaching practice that you have used or are planning to use. Please describe your experiences and list potential questions that you may have for discussing.

Both types of papers should be sent to the organizers of this conference, Philippe Silberzahn: silberzahn@em-lyon.com and Jeroen Kraaijenbrink: j.kraaijenbrink@utwente.nl before February 8th, 2013*.
Please indicate the track you are submitting for (Teaching or research).

Information & registration
The registration fee for the conference is €100. To keep the interactive and community atmosphere of the previous conference, participation will be limited to 50 participants. For information concerning registration and logistics, as well as updates of the program, please consult the website: http://effectuationconference.wordpress.com/

Important deadlines
Research/teaching paper submission: Friday, February 8th, 2013
Author notification: Monday, March 4th, 2013
Registration open: Monday, May 6th, 2013
Conference: June 3rd and 4th, 2013 (just before Babson, also in Lyon this year)

Looking forward to welcoming you in Lyon!

Philippe Silberzahn, Professor of Entrepreneurship, EMLYON Business School.
Jeroen Kraaijenbrink, Associate professor of Strategic Entrepreneurship, Netherlands Institute of Knowledge Intensive Entrepreneurship (NIKOS), University of Twente

Practical conference information:
Jocelyne MASSARD
Tel. +33 (0)4 78 33 79 43
Mail : massard@em-lyon.com

* An earlier post of this announcement offered a deadline of March 30 to submit materials.  For people who send us material by February 8th, we will come back to you soon.  And for those who send materials between Feb 8 and March 30, we will be happy to include them given appropriate work and available space.

May
27
Mon
2013
DREAM Effectuation Doctoral Seminar in Dubrovnik, Croatia, May 27-31 2013
May 27 @ 11:00 am – May 31 @ 5:00 pm

dream_participants_dubrovnik_2011Offered in conjunction with the Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, there will be a Effectuation Doctoral Seminar in Dubrovnik, Croatia from May 27-31 2013.  All the information and contacts to register are posted at http://www.ices.hr/en/izdvojeno/dream-doctoral-retreatseminar-on-entrepr… .  We hope to see you there (2011 group pictured here)!